Delicate Subject Series – Youth Population: Alcohol, Rape, Social Media

How many times have we heard about underage females becoming intoxicated at social functions, passing out, and then being raped, videotaped by the perpetrators, with those images placed out on social media which further humiliate them?  Too often.  No one has the right to take advantage of them, and they have no right placing themselves in dangerous situations.

Parents have to speak to their children beginning at a young age (five) regarding appropriate behaviors, and those which aren’t.  Girls cannot afford to walk around with an ignorance about opportunities where someone can rob them of their dignity.  Boys have to learn to respect females and not even consider violating them in any manner whatsoever. Conversations have to be ongoing throughout before, and after, they enter university.  The authoritarian parental approach may be required for this purpose to scare them into understanding they will not shame themselves, nor the family.

Vikki

A Dangerous Mental Health Condition**

It has to be reiterated that most people diagnosed with a psychiatric illness pose no danger to others, or themselves. The majority of this population desire a well-adjusted mental health.  As positive as that reality is, we have to understand various causations in that small percentage who do become dangerous.  It’s an unpleasant subject many refuse to look at, with several media pundits unwilling to have honest discussions, talking around the issue as though if it’s left out of the conversation no one will notice.  However, until society does focus on “mental” instability and “dangerousness”, the world won’t see a reduction of this brand of criminality.  The following are several items which deserve analysis.*

  • Sudden Stoppage of Medication.  A lion pouncing on someone when it hasn’t eaten for a few days. It’s analogous to the patient who may become dangerous when they suddenly stop taking medication.  These pills are strong and take several weeks to gain traction to reduce symptoms associated with the condition.  Thus, it’s a shock to the brain when the medication is no longer in the system, which may result with the patient spinning out of control mentally.  If they wish to cease taking medication, they should inform the psychiatrist to gradually receive lesser dosages over a period of time, until they are no longer on the psychotropics.
  • Lack of Guardian.  Families have to take the initiative in getting a conservatorship when they believe a member is irresponsible in caring for their mental health.  The patient has to report to this guardian on a daily basis before proceeding with usual activities.  It’s a form of neglect, regardless the age of the patient, to allow them to enter society with an unprepared mental health.
  • Alcohol, Illegal Drugs p. 1.  A patient is setting themselves up for a mental thunderstorm when combining these substances with their mental health condition whether they’re using psychotropics, or not.
  • Alcohol, Illegal Drugs, p. 2.  The individual who begins with a healthy psychology, then starts abusing these substances, automatically has a mental illness, even if they don’t have schizophrenia, mood disorders, and other psychiatric conditions associated with a chemical breakdown from using drugs.
  • Lack of Positive Coping Mechanisms. This skill set is important for everyone, especially the patient who has to remember that disappointments are a part of life.
  • Ordinary Citizens. Failing to call the police when they observe someone they wholeheartedly believe may pose a danger to society.  Even if police can’t do anything: We have to wait until something actually happens, there’s a paper trail about the individual they can refer to.
  • Deep-Brain Injury.  An individual could begin with a healthy psychology, then experiences a deep-brain injury.  Not everyone in this category is dangerous, although some may result with a level of dangerousness (i.e., ASPD Level 2).  They have to be monitored on a regular basis with a host of evaluations because of personality changes.
  • A Blow to the Head, but not Deep-Brain Injury.  A patient may experience personality changes, temporarily, which have to be monitored on a regular basis with a host of evaluations.
  • Congenital Brain Malfunction. The individual has to be supervised on a regular basis by family (i.e., conservatorship), psychiatrists, and physicians.
  • The Lack of Workplace Personality Assessments.  The employer who refuses this instrument for the pre-employment screening could face unbelievable liability.
  • The Psychological Board. A compulsory standard Duty to Protect and Duty to Warn doctrines are required in all states and districts, instead of both doctrines in some regions, one or the other in separate regions, and the incredibly vague language nurturing confusion.
  • The Clinician.   If they fail in whatever current Duty to Protect/Duty to Warn responsibilities, they have created a series of events they will regret forever.
  • Police Officers.  Most are a community’s best friend!  They have incredible challenges which couldn’t have been recognized when joining the Police Force because of increased responsibilities.  An officer never wants to pull the trigger unless it’s absolutely necessary, and most never fire their guns.  They wish to return to their families at the end of an exhausting day.  However, if an officer fails to respond when the clinician informs them in their Duty to Warn capacity, they should turn in their badge and find a different area of employment.

Conclusion

A safer world becomes prevalent only when an honest dialogue about mental health begins, with additional entities becoming more involved, instead of believing it’s someone else’s problem.

*There are always unknown causations waiting to be discovered.

**Not every dangerous person has a mental illness.

 

Vikki

Anger Management

All of us become angry every now and again.  It’s a healthy emotion. We’re capable of recognizing the anger and calming ourselves down before it gets out of control. But when should individuals seek counseling before the anger governs their lives?  The following are a couple of examples:

  • A want to maintain the anger internally.
  • Repetitive arguments with spouse, friends, and co-workers.

RED ALERT. When the problem has escalated and therapy is a must:

  • Verbal violence (i.e., name calling, swearing, making threats against individuals, their property)
  • Destructive behavior such as breaking items.
  • Problems with the law.
  • Engaging in physical violence towards loved ones.

Individuals with anger management problems may have underlying depression and if  they refuse to enter therapy, may experience psychiatric difficulties because the brain chemistry has altered.

Anger management therapy will teach the patient to use anger constructively.  They will take their frustrations and develop clarity.  The patient will also learn how to discuss feelings they’re experiencing, instead of verbal violence towards others.  Finally, therapy will help the patient avoid searching for alcohol and illegal substances for a means of escape.

Vikki