Anger Management

All of us become angry every now and again.  It’s a healthy emotion. We’re capable of recognizing the anger and calming ourselves down before it gets out of control. But when should individuals seek counseling before the anger governs their lives?  The following are a couple of examples:

  • A want to maintain the anger internally.
  • Repetitive arguments with spouse, friends, and co-workers.

RED ALERT. When the problem has escalated and therapy is a must:

  • Verbal violence (i.e., name calling, swearing, making threats against individuals, their property)
  • Destructive behavior such as breaking items.
  • Problems with the law.
  • Engaging in physical violence towards loved ones.

Individuals with anger management problems may have underlying depression and if  they refuse to enter therapy, may experience psychiatric difficulties because the brain chemistry has altered.

Anger management therapy will teach the patient to use anger constructively.  They will take their frustrations and develop clarity.  The patient will also learn how to discuss feelings they’re experiencing, instead of verbal violence towards others.  Finally, therapy will help the patient avoid searching for alcohol and illegal substances for a means of escape.

Vikki

Borderline Personality Disorder

Individuals with Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD) have wild mood swings, short-term intense depression and anxiety, engage in risky behaviors (i.e., sexual practices, driving habits, gambling, illegal drug use), and self-injury.  They do not have a sense of themselves, and have a fear of being alone.  The individual with BPD has relationship difficulties because they antagonize people they once held in high regard.  Because they view issues as either positive or negative, they cannot find the middle ground where appropriate.  They exhibit anger management problems and can become violent.

Causes of BPD:

  • Abandonment in childhood (genuine or imagined)
  • Brain Abnormalities (i.e., emotion regulation, aggression)
  • Chemical Imbalance (i.e., serotonin)
  • Child Abuse
  • Genetics

Additional problems resulting from BPD:

  • Alcoholism
  • Anxiety Disorders
  • Bipolar Disorder
  • Confrontations with Law Enforcement
  • Eating Disorders
  • Excessive Debt
  • Illegal Substance Abuse Addiction
  • Sexually-Transmitted Diseases
  • Unexpected Pregnancies

Psychotherapy and drug therapy* are treatments for BPD.

*When absolutely necessary.

Vikki